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Thomas Hardy (Томас Харди)


In the Study


He enters, and mute on the edge of a chair
Sits a thin-faced lady, a stranger there,
A type of decayed gentility;
And by some small signs he well can guess
That she comes to him almost breakfastless.

‘I have called – I hope I do not err –
I am looking for a purchaser
Of some score volumes of the works
Of eminent divines I own, –
Left by my father – though it irks
My patience to offer them.’ And she smiles
As if necessity were unknown;
‘But the truth of it is that oftenwhiles
I have wished, as I am fond of art,
To make my rooms a little smart,
And these old books are so in the way.’
And lightly still she laughs to him,
As if to sell were a mere gay whim,
And that, to be frank, Life were indeed
To her not vinegar and gall,
But fresh and honey-like; and Need
No household skeleton at all.



Thomas Hardy's other poems:
  1. For Life I Had Never Cared Greatly
  2. On the Belgian Expatriation
  3. An Appeal to America on Behalf of the Belgian Destitute
  4. Men Who March Away
  5. In Time of Wars and Tumults


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