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Poem by James Clerk Maxwell


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I.

Will you come along with me,
In the fresh spring-tide,
My comforter to be
Through the world so wide?
Will you come and learn the ways
A student spends his days,
On the bonny, bonny braes
Of our ain burnside?


II.

For the lambs will soon be here,
In the fresh spring-tide;
As lambs come every year
On our ain burnside.
Poor things, they will not stay,
But we will keep the day
When first we saw them play
On our ain burnside.


III.

We will watch the budding trees
In the fresh spring-tide,
While the murmurs of the breeze
Through the branches glide.
Where the mavis builds her nest,
And finds both work and rest,
In the bush she loves the best,
On our ain burnside.


IV.

And the life we then shall lead
In the fresh spring-tide,
Will make thee mine indeed,
Though the world be wide.
No strangerТs blame or praise
Shall turn us from the ways
That brought us happy days
On our ain burnside. 



James Clerk Maxwell


James Clerk Maxwell's other poems:
  1. Numa Pompilius
  2. In Memory of Edward Wilson, Who Repented of what was in his Mind to Write after Section
  3. Song Of The Edinburgh Academician
  4. Cats Cradle Song, By A Babe In Knots
  5. Report On Tait's Lecture On Force


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