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Poem by Thomas Urquhart


Epigrams. The Second Booke. № 35. How deplorable the condition of most men is, who, though they attaine to the fruition of their praete∣rit projects, by covering neverthelesse the possession of future pleasures, honours, and commodities, never receive con∣tentment (is they ought) in the present time


IN things, to fortune Subject, when we get
What we did long for, we anew desire
To have wherewith t'uphold the former state:
Which likewise, we obtaining, more require;
For businesse engendreth businesse:
And hope, being th'usher of another hope,
Our enjoyd' wishes serve but to make place
To after aimes, whose purchase to the top
Of our ambition never reacheth; thus
By still aspiring higher we can find
No end in miseries, that trouble us:
Turmoyle the body: and perplex our mind,
Although we change with great varietie
The matter, which procures our miserie.



Thomas Urquhart


Thomas Urquhart's other poems:
  1. Epigrams. The Third Booke. № 37. The advantages of Povertie
  2. Epigrams. The Second Booke. № 31. As it was a precept of antiquity, to leane more to vertue, then parentage: so is it a tenet of christianity, to repose more trust on the blood of christ, then our owne merits
  3. Epigrams. The Third Booke. № 18. Of the covetous, and perverse inclinati∣on of the greatest part of Man∣kind
  4. Epigrams. The Third Booke. № 44. Age meerly depending on the continuall Flux of time, we have very small reason to boast of a long life, already obtained: or be proud of the hope, hereafter to attaine un∣to it
  5. Epigrams. The Third Booke. № 1. How to behave ones selfe in all occasions


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