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Poem by William Watson


The River


I

As drones a bee with sultry hum
When all the world with heat lies dumb,
Thou dronest through the drowsèd lea,
To lose thyself and find the sea.

As fares the soul that threads the gloom
Toward an unseen goal of doom,
Thou farest forth all witlessly,
To lose thyself and find the sea.

II

My soul is such a stream as thou,
Lapsing along it heeds not how;
In one thing only unlike thee,
Losing itself, it finds no sea.

Albeit I know a day shall come
When its dull waters will be dumb;
And then this river-soul of Me,
Losing itself, shall find the sea.



William Watson


William Watson's other poems:
  1. On Exaggerated Deference to Foreign Literary Opinion
  2. On Landor's Hellenics
  3. England to Ireland
  4. A Child's Hair
  5. The Glimpse


Poems of the other poets with the same name:

  • Coventry Patmore The River ("It is a venerable place")
  • Thomas Aird The River ("Infant of the weeping hills")
  • Charles Sorley The River ("He watched the river running black") February 1913
  • Rose Cooke The River ("The river flows and flows away")
  • Ella Wilcox The River ("I am a river flowing from Gods sea")

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